Frequently Asked Questions have been categorised as follows:
[This page is always under construction as answers to queries are regularly posted here]

 

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Spider Veins

Q What are spider viens?What do they look like?
Spider veins are the dilation of a small group of blood vessels located near the skin's surface. They are extremely small vessels that become larger when small venules inside or underneath the skin become enlarged or dilated. This normally happens when the pressure inside the veins increases so much that it exceeds the normal resistance to blood flow.
Spider veins are normally found on the legs and face. They often look like red or purple spider webs.

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Port Wine Stain and Birthmarks

Q: What are all these acronyms?
A: · PWS = Port Wine Stain
· BM = Birthmark

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Q: Are birthmarks genetic?
A: There is no conclusive scientific evidence, at this time, that points to a genetic reason for a birthmark. Recent studies suggest there may be a genetic predisposition to the underlying cause of a birthmark and that it may be triggered by an in utero incident.

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Q: What causes a birthmark?
A: Again, there is no conclusive universally accepted scientific reason, though everyone is in pretty much agreement it wasn't the stork. There is a lot of folklore surrounding this one. Latest findings suggest a genetic component controlling the musculature of the arterial and capillary walls in the region.

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Q: Is PWS a purely cosmetic problem?
A: Absolutely NOT, though a lot of insurance companies would like you to believe it is. Depending on the location of the pws complications such as glaucoma, thickening of the skin, raised granulomas, enlarged libs, loss of sensation in extremities, not to mention psychological and social issues.
Port Wine Stain
A: Darkening and pebbling does not necessarily happen in all cases, but is certainly common. The current thinking is that the blood vessels in the port wine stain continue to grow with age (hypertrophy). This causes the skin volume in the area to increase and more blood to show through which makes it look darker. Pebbling appears to be caused by small blood vessels pushing their way up to the skin. Often times small bumps will develop that can spontaneously bleed. Typically, this doesn't begin happening until a person is in his or her 30s, 40s, or 50s.
Laser treatments are generally very effective at reducing these problems.

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Q: Do all PWS inevitably get worse over the years?

A: Not in all cases, but in many. Thickening of the skin, pebbling, darkening of the stain, and spontaneous bleeding can all occur if left untreated.

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Q: Will the PWS recur even after laser treatments?
A: In almost all cases YES. Lasers only treat the symptom and not the cause of the stain. At this point in time, it is the best technology medical science has. After the initial set of treatments is finished and you and your doctor are satisfied with the results, a follow-up treatment is only needed when you feel the stain is darkening.

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Q: What is thermal relaxation time?
A: It is the time necessary for the targeted blood vessel to cool by half of its peak temperature after laser irradiation.

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Squamous cell carcinoma

Q: What is
Squamous cell carcinoma
A:Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a malignant neoplasm of keratinocytes with many features one of which is the production of keratin. Etiology, histology, and clinical presentations vary. SCC can be categorized histologically into in situ (intraepidermal) or invasive (penetrating the dermal-epidermal junction). Some examples of in situ SCC include Bowen's disease and erythroplasia of Queyrat. SCC of the lip is one example of invasive carcinoma.
Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common skin cancer after basal cell carcinoma. It typically occurs on sun-exposed areas of the body and is more common in light-skinned men greater than 55 years. The incidence of SCC increases closer to the equator.

Predisposing factors for SCC include a family history of skin cancer, precursor lip lesions from smoking, actinic keratosis, old burn scars, immunosuppression, ultraviolet radiation, radiation therapy, and chemical carcinogens such as soot and arsenic.

The lesions progressively increase in size either rapidly over months or slowly over years. They typically are firm, skin-colored, occasionally red or yellow, papules, nodules, or plaques, that are smooth, verrucous, crusted, ulcerated, or hyperkeratotic, occurring in skin or on mucous membranes. Lesions on the lower lip, or in a scar, have up to a 20% probability of metastasizing. Lesions on sun-damaged skin have a 2% tendency to metastasize. Metastasis is primarily by way of the lymphatics, generally first to regional lymph nodes. Metastasis by hematogenous spread to distant sites can occur, most commonly to the brain, lungs, liver, bone, or skin.

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Scar

Q:What is a scar?
A:A scar is the body’s natural way of healing and replacing lost or damaged skin. A scar is usually composed of fibrous tissue. Scars may be formed for many different reasons, including as a result of infections, surgery, injuries, or inflammation of tissue. Scars may appear anywhere on the body, and the composition of a scar may vary - appearing flat, lumpy, sunken, colored, painful, or itchy. The final look of a scar depends of many factors, including the skin type and location on the body, the direction of the wound, the type of injury, age of the person with the scar, and his/her nutritional status.

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Scar Revision

Q:What is a scar revision?
A scar revision is a procedure performed on a scar to alter the appearance of the scar. The revision may improve the appearance of the scar or restore function to a part of the body that may have been restricted by the scar. It is important to remember that scars cannot be completely removed.

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Q:What are the different types of scars and treatment?
There are many different types of scars, including the following:

Keloid scars

Q:What are keloid scars?
A:These are thick, rounded, irregular clusters of scar tissue that grow at the site of a wound on the skin, but beyond the edges of the borders of the wound. They often appear red or darker in color, as compared to the surrounding normal skin. Keloids are formed from collagen that the body produces after a wound has healed. These scars may appear anywhere on the body. They occur more often in darker-skinned people. Keloid scars may occur up to one year after the original trauma to the skin.

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Hypertropic Scars

Q:What are hypertrophic scars?
A:Hypertrophic scars are similar to keloid scars, however, their growth is confined within the boundaries of the original skin defect. These scars may also appear red, and are usually thick and elevated. Hypertrophic scars usually start to develop within weeks after the injury to the skin.

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Keratoacanthoma

Q. What is Keratoacanthoma?
A:It is a type of skin cancer confined to the skin. These skin tumors grow from the hair follicle and usually grow quickly. They are more common in men.

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Q:What are the causes of
Keratoacanthoma ?
A: Sunlight is thought to be a factor in the development of keratoacanthomas. Keratoacanthomas are more common in people who smoke. Sometimes minor trauma to the skin occurs before the development of a keratoacanthoma.

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Hair Removal and IPL Technology


Q:How does IPL remove hair?
A:Highly controlled flashes of light are selectively absorbed by hair-filled follicles lying below the surface of the skin. The absorbed light heats the hair, which damages or destroys the regrowth potential of the follicle all without damaging the surrounding tissue.

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Q:What happens during a treatment?
A:It begins by trimming away the hair above the skin. You may be asked to wear dark glasses to protect your eyes from the bright light. Next, a cold gel (similar to ultrasound gel) may be spread over the treatment area. The IPL hand-piece is then applied to your skin and pulses of light begin disabling your unwanted hair. When the gel is removed, much of the hair is wiped off with it. The remaining hair in the treated area falls out over the next week or two.

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Q:What does the treatment feel like?

A:Each pulse of light feels like a slight sting or pinch, similar to the snap of a rubber band. No local anesthesia is required and most people tolerate the treatment well.

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Q:Can all hair be treated?

A:IPL's unique design offers you customized treatment according to your hair color, texture and body location. Any hair with at least some pigment in it can be treated effectively.

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Q:Is IPL safe for all skin types?

A:IPL is the first photoepilation procedure proven to effectively treat unwanted hair on all skin types, including dark-skinned individuals such as those of Black, Hispanic and Asian descent.

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Q:Are there any possible side effects?

A:Side effects are rare. You may experience some slight reddening or local swelling at the treatment site, but this typically goes away within hours. On rare occasions, some blistering or bruising may occur, but typically resolves quickly. Also, the skin can become darker or lighter following treatment, but will generally return to normal within a few weeks. Limiting sun exposure before and after each treatment will minimize the risk of complications.

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Q:What kind of results should I expect?

A:IPL technology has been proven to create a permanent reduction in the number of regrowing hairs following each treatment in most skin types. The number of treatments required depends on several factors related to your specific kind of hair and skin. A customized treatment program will be designed for you along with an estimate of how many treatments you may need in order to meet your expectations.

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Q:Is it right for you?

A:More advanced than even lasers, IPL is the first photoepilation technology proven to treat unwanted hair safely on any skin type--from very white to black. In order to ensure the best outcome, you may be asked about your medical history and skin type in order to estimate the results you should expect from your customized treatment program.


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Spider veins & VascuLight System

Q:What are spider Viens?
A:. Spider veins are the small superficial purple or red veins stretching like a web under the skin.

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Q:What preparations must I make?
A:There are not changes in activities, before or after treatment. Prior to and following any type of laser or IPL treatment, you must limit your exposure to the sun; treatment should not be performed on tanned skin.


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Q:Is it right for you?

A:Your doctor will be happy to discuss this treatment with you and whether you are a candidate for this procedure. Contact us for consultation.

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